November 11th, 2021

Bo head on
  • agdhani

NaNoWriMo 2021! Day 27/Day 11

Advice: Motivate yourself with social validation. Join groups (or start your own) where everyone posts their daily word count. Not only will it encourage you to keep writing, it will also give you an immediate endorphin rush when you post your word count wins.

Prompt: There's a huge deadline coming up for your main character, and they'll go to any lengths to meet it. What happens when they go to the extreme?

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Teen Wolf::Derek::Hale House

Word of the Day 11/11/21 Verst

Verst (noun)
verst or verste, werste [ vurst, verst ]


noun
1. a Russian measure of distance equivalent to 3,500 feet, or 0.6629 mile (1.067 kilometers).

Origin: First recorded in 1545–55; from French verste or German Werst, from Russian verstá; Old Russian vĭrsta “age, agemate, pair, measure of length,” cognate with Czech vrstva “layer, stratum, bed,” Polish warstwa “layer, coating, sheet,” Serbo-Croatian vŕsta “sort, kind, species,” Old Church Slavonic vrĭsta “age, time of life,” from unrecorded Slavic vĭrsta “turn, bend,” from the Proto-Indo-European extended root vert- “to turn, wind,” source of Latin vertere “to turn,” and English suffix -ward; see convert, verse

HOW TO USE VERST IN A SENTENCE
For the distance of half a verst the vehicle forced its way through a compact crowd which quickly reformed its ranks.
MY RELIGION|LEO TOLSTOY

In the empty streets, every conversation could be heard a verst away; voices and footsteps re-echoed on the wooden pavement.
THE PRECIPICE|IVAN GONCHAROV

When he had gone a verst his strength gave out, his feet were sore.
A RUSSIAN PROPRIETOR|LYOF N. TOLSTOI

Its length is six hundred verst, and its peaks seem to be crushed under the heavy clouds.
EMPIRES AND EMPERORS OF RUSSIA, CHINA, KOREA, AND JAPAN|PTER VAY

Now YOU come up with a sentence (or fic? or graphic?) that best illustrates the word.
Hawaii Five 0::team::Ohana

Thursday Tropes: Week 43

It's been a minute, hasn't it? Well, we're back...and maybe slightly different?

no title

This time around...A. FULL. YEAR. OF. TROPES!

Some Thursdays will have 2 tropes, some will have 3, but I think the majority will have 1 that's really popular.

Descriptions will be pulled from TV Tropes and a link provided if you want more information.

The rules? They're simple. Write at least 250 words or create 2 icons/1 banner. Anything from suggestive to outright porn is allowed.

This week, there are 2 tropes!

Remember the New Guy?: A previously unmentioned character who suddenly appears without notice and who we are told was really there all along but just... off-screen or something. It comes about because the writers want to introduce a new character, but don't want to come up with a complex introduction where everyone meets them and learns what they're like—it's just easier to pretend that everyone automatically knows them, and the relationship is ready-made. "Oh hey, that's my old rival!" "Oh, this is my brother/sister whom I've never told you about," etc.

In other words, this is a relative or a friend or even a rival whom we really should have met, or at least heard about before, since the other characters would have us believe they have been crewing the same starship, working on the same project or sitting on the other side of the same classroom for years.

This can work if the character (and the actor) proves compelling enough for the audience to suspend their disbelief, or that it's possible nobody mentioned them "on-camera" before (like if the show is set in a school, and the character is a casual acquaintance of the others but hasn't done anything significant to the plot until now). It's also possible if there's an in-story reason for the character to have been incognito (perhaps they were a spy, or an escaped convict), and the character was there in plain sight all along, but disguised as one of the show's many extras. Among the most clumsy versions is the "Long-Lost Daughter/Son". This trope can be especially disruptive if the new addition doesn't fit the tone of the series.

Click the title to read more.

The Trouble with Tickets: A good bet in a Sitcom is that when a character gets ticketed by a cop for a relatively minor traffic violation, he won't shrug, say "Ah well," and pay the fine. He will decide to take it to traffic court, fight in the name of the little guy, and do his best Perry Mason/Matt Murdock/Phoenix Wright impersonation. He'll spend more money fighting the ticket than just paying it off and going about his business.

See also It's the Principle of the Thing.