November 6th, 2021

Bo head on
  • agdhani

NaNoWriMo 2021! Day 22/Day 6

Advice: Trust your characters, even when they wander. Listen to your characters as you write. Follow whatever crazy characters show up, down any rabbit-hole they pursue, and let yourself be surprised. Maybe the tangent will prove relevant and important to the plot. Maybe it will be edited out later. But for the month of November, it is all words and listening to your characters whims can help you learn who they are and what they value just a little bit better.

Prompt: Your main character is a world traveler, who has been nearly everywhere. But there's one last place that they've never been able to go. Tell the story of why that is and how they manage to get there.

Image:
22.jpg
Hawaii Five 0::Steve & Joan

Word of the Day 11/06/21 Ravenous

Ravenous (adjective)
ravenous [ rav-uh-nuhs ]


adjective
1. extremely hungry; famished; voracious: feeling ravenous after a hard day's work.
2. extremely rapacious: a ravenous jungle beast.
3. intensely eager for gratification or satisfaction.

WORDS RELATED TO RAVENOUS
ferocious, greedy, insatiable, rapacious, voracious, avaricious, covetous, devouring, edacious, empty, famished, gluttonous, grasping, insatiate, omnivorous, predatory, ravening, starved, wolfish

OTHER WORDS FROM RAVENOUS
rav·en·ous·ly, adverb
rav·en·ous·ness, noun

See synonyms for: ravenous / ravenousness on Thesaurus.com
OTHER WORDS FOR RAVENOUS
1. greedy, starved, devouring.
2. predatory.

SYNONYM STUDY FOR RAVENOUS
1. Ravenous, ravening, voracious suggest a greediness for food and usually intense hunger. Ravenous implies extreme hunger, or a famished condition: ravenous wild beasts. Ravening adds the idea of fierceness and savagery, especially as shown in a violent manner of acquiring food: ravening wolves. Voracious implies craving or eating a great deal of food: a voracious child; a voracious appetite. It may also be used figuratively: a voracious reader.

OPPOSITES FOR RAVENOUS
1. sated.

Origin: First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English, from Old French ravineus, equivalent to ravin(er) “to plunder” (See raven) + -eus-ous

Now YOU come up with a sentence (or fic? or graphic?) that best illustrates the word.